• profileIt's not just pictures of the cats.

    About a boy named Hugo, a girl named Sophia, and three cats.

    December 2014
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hair, growing

hair




She’s a Daddy’s girl.

pettiskirt

What a princess

A bunny rabbit for MY DADDY




Powerhouse Museum

We went to the Powerhouse Museum for the first time. At the moment they have a “Back to the 80s” exhibition which was interesting … Hugo now believes that I grew up in a disco wearing really ugly clothes (ok maybe that bit is true). It’s funny how many 80s icons are making a resurgence at the moment. Rubiks cubes, Strawberry Shortcake, My Little Ponies …. we can only hope the fashion stays where it belongs in history.

There were other exhibitions we liked as well, particularly the science/experiments, space and steam trains. And I really, really loved the ” …. never done … Women’s work in the home” exhibition, and would have liked to see more of it but I had to leave to go home and do the vacuuming and cook dinner.

On the way out as we walked past the 80s exhibition, I heard a father shouting at a child “If you don’t settle down and start behaving, we are GOING HOME RIGHT NOW!!” and I thought to myself, wow – that’s EXACTLY like I remember the 80s! ;)

Back to the 80s
(I don’t like this cube, it’s too hard to break apart and put back together in colour order … which was, and still is, the only way I can solve the Rubiks cube.)




Easter hat parade

IMG_0802

Starting school brings a whole new set of parental responsibilities … such as constructing Easter hat parade hats. I have vague memories of my own childhood wearing a set of bunny ears but when I heard from another mum that the Easter Hat Parade at Hugo’s school was “bigger than Ben Hur” I knew bunny ears weren’t going to cut it.

We left it a bit late to find Easter-y decorations (well, I hadn’t thought so, but the slim pickings left in the shops said otherwise), but we managed to put together a pretty good hat between us.




hair, gone!

World's Greatest Shave - hair gone

On Saturday I had my hair shaved off (to a #1) to raise money for the World’s Greatest Shave. Hugo and Sophia supported me by having their hair sprayed with colours (a bit difficult to see in the picture above). From a purely practical perspective, I really like it – it’s absolutely low maintenance :D I’m not very keen on the look, so it’s not likely I’ll ever do it again, but I’m not as bereft about losing my hair as I thought I might be. I don’t actually mind that much … my biggest concern – that the children wouldn’t like it – was unfounded. They both tell me they like it and it looks good (haha!), and from Sophie “It looks like Daddy’s hair!” (which is intended as a compliment).

A huge thank you to everyone who sponsored me and others for the World’s Greatest Shave.




World’s Greatest Shave

The World’s Greatest Shave is the Leukemia Foundation’s major fundraiser in Australia each year.

This year I’ve decided to participate … yes, actually shaving my head. I was flicking through some blogs a couple of weeks ago, while contemplating the unfortunate state of my hair, and when I read a post about the World’s Greatest Shave, the answer seemed clear to me.

I have some worries … mostly, that the children will just freak out when they see it … and some superficial concerns. But in the end it’s just hair, and it will grow back. And it’s a really good cause!

So if you want to sponsor me, please do! RIGHT HERE

Otherwise, if you happen to see me in the next few months and wonder about my hair, spare a thought for those people who through no choice of their own have to deal with baldness (and much worse) as a result of treatment for leukemia and other cancers.

And so … here is my hair, soon to be gone. (Please be kind, it goes against every bone in my body to actually take a photo of myself, let alone post it publicly for the world to see).

Hair




Glow worm tunnel, Wollemi National Park.

Glow worm tunnel walk

Watching a lot of David Attenborough has given Hugo quite a big interest in nature and animals. For a while he has wanted to see glow worms so we decided to drive down to the Glow Worm Tunnel just out of Lithgow this weekend. The glow worm tunnel is an old disused railway tunnel and can be accessed by walking along the disused railway corridor, a very pretty and easy walk.

It took about 2.5-3 hours to drive there (including 35+kms of bone jarring, tooth shattering dirt track). It wasn’t particularly well signposted, but if you follow Glow Worm Tunnel Road through the state forest into the National Park, and basically keep going until you can’t go any further, you’re in the right place. There is a car park area about 5km before the vehicle barrier, or you can drive right down to the vehicle barrier (though the road does get narrower and twistier beyond the car park, and you’ll pass through a short rock tunnel before you arrive at the vehicle barrier).

There is enough room for parking several cars at the vehicle barrier (and there’s a toilet as well), and the walk to the tunnel from the barrier is less that 2km, and a fairly easy grade. Hugo (who *hates* walking) was able to do the walk himself (and even Sophie managed it almost all the way back by herself, jumping in all the puddles left by the recent rain “I’m Peppa Pig!!”. Confirmation that yes, I do still need to bring a spare set of clothes for her everywhere we go). A few places the kids needed help stepping over logs and puddles, but generally was an easy walk.

You need a torch in the tunnel to see where you’re walking (there is a water course in the tunnel, but it is possible to avoid walking in it), but once you’ve reached about the middle – when you can’t see light coming in from either end – turn off the torch and wait a few minutes to adjust to the darkness, and you are rewarded with a multitude of beautiful constellation-like glowing blue spots all over the ceiling and walls of the tunnel. Sophie was disappointed there were no ‘girl’ – pink – glow worms but the rest of us were impressed. Pack a picnic lunch (and plenty of drinking water) for a fun and interesting day trip. If you’re really keen or up early enough, you can probably even fit in a visit to the Zig Zag Railway as well.




back on the bike

I really miss our kangaroo bike.

Today Sophie and I finally got back on the bike (a beautiful velorbis  – real photos of ours to follow eventually. Maybe.) which was less frightening than I thought it would be … *now* I really appreciate the bike lanes and extremely flat terrain of Copenhagen. Just to give it a proper Danish flavour, it was actually raining as well, although hot! and extremely humid. We didn’t go far, just enough to get started again. Sophie loved it, I didn’t hate it ;) I’ll have to start working out nice quiet street routes to places we go regularly so we can use the bike while Hugo is at school. Hopefully he’ll soon be confident enough on his bike so we can all go together.

I read on the Copenhagenize blog that the lakes are frozen enough to walk on. My first thought was, “that would have saved me so much time taking Hugo to børnehave”. My second thought was, hmm that’s a lot of cold! (Although I’m not entirely convinced at the moment that humidity + rain + heat actually beats snow + cold + dark).




It’s hard to be the one left behind.

Today is Hugo’s first day at school, proper ‘big’ school. How did he get to be five already? Where did those years go?

We have had the usual anxieties in the lead up to school starting (mostly mine … will he be able to open his lunch box? will he know to eat his morning tea at morning tea, and lunch at lunch? will his new shoes hurt? will he get lost? will he be happy?). On Monday he had his Best Start Assessment with one of his teachers (it’s a job-share position for his class), and I was waiting in the playground while he was inside when all of the older kids came out for lunch. It was chaotic, and all I could think was “how can I send him off on his own to deal with this?!” which is kind of crazy, because he was at børnehave in Denmark 5 days a week, and Kindergarten isn’t *that* different.

When we arrived at school this morning, we met his other teacher and he settled straight in and found an activity to do. Sophie on the other hand fell apart. She has been quite teary all week when we’ve talked about Hugo going to school, and today she was devastated that she couldn’t stay with him. It was really quite emotional :( In the end we decided to go and get a smiley face biscuit from the bakery to feed her grieving soul, which helped a little bit.

In a couple of hours we’ll pick him up again, and then we’ll come home and set up his facebook account* so he can keep up with all his new friends ;)

first day - happy

* No, we won’t really set him up a facebook account. That was a joke.




Happy New Year!

Once you have children, staying up until midnight loses some of it’s allure when you realise children will wake up at day break, no matter what (unless that’s just *my* children). I didn’t let the children stay up, not even for the 9pm fireworks. We celebrated the next day instead, catching up with family for a barbeque.

Sophie, thwarted from wearing all her finery to usher in the New Year, decided to wear it *all* the next day. She looks BEAUTIFUL! (She told us so!).